Welcome to Concordia Historical Institute, Department of Archives and History for the Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod.

Today in History

August 2

1520 Albrecht Dürer (14711528), German painter and engraver, was accepted with honors at Antwerp, honors he never received at Nürnberg.

1532 Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (15001558) ratified the Religious Peace of Nürnberg.

1552 The Treaty of Passau was signed, granting religious freedom to Protestants in Germany.

1785 Georg Schmidt, missionary to South Africa, died (b. 30 September 1709, Kunewalde, Moravia).

1792 Samson Occom, hymnist, died (b. 1723).

1844 Isaac Hecker (18191888), founder of the Paulist Fathers, made his confession and was received into the Roman Catholic Church.

1846 Concordia Theological Seminary (Fort Wayne, Indiana) was founded.

1908 Fredrik Franson (b. 17 June 1852), missions pioneer, died.

1909 John George Butler, Senate and House chaplain and Civil War hospital chaplain, died (b. 28 January 1826, Cumberland, Maryland).

1919 Alwin Ellis Nieting was born in Egeland, North Dakota (d. 30 September 1997). He graduated from Concordia Seminary (Saint Louis) in 1944 and served as a pastor in Chamberlain, Oklahoma, and in South Dakota. He became an executive of the South Dakota District and district executive of the Iowa District. He was also president of the Iowa District West. He retired in 1985.

1930 Conrad Emil Lindberg, Swedish theologian and editor, died (6 June  1852, Jönköping, Sweden).

1930 Jesse L. Hurlbut (b. 1843), U.S. Methodist clergyman and author of Hurlbut’s Story of the Bible, died. After holding several pastorates between 1865 and 1879, Hurlbut worked closely with the American Sunday School Union for twenty years. He was also one of the founders of the Methodist Epworth League in 1889 (forerunner of the UMYF, or youth fellowship).

1941 Anna B. D. Hoppe, hymnist and hymn translator, died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (b. 7 May 1889, Milwaukee).

1942 Edith Stein (18911942) was seized by the German S.S. and was taken to a concentration camp in the Netherlands. The Jewish-Catholic philosopher had remained in danger in Germany although she had a visa to Switzerland because she would not desert her sister, who could not get a visa.