Welcome to Concordia Historical Institute, Department of Archives and History for the Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod.

Today in History

October 30

1536 Lutheranism was made the official religion in Denmark by edict of Christian III (1503–1559).

1553 Jakob Sturm, statesman, educator and reformer at Strasbourg, died (b. 10 August 1489, Strasbourg).

1768 The Wesley Chapel on John Street in New York City was formally dedicated. It was the first Methodist Church building in America. The edifice was rebuilt in 1817 and again in 1840.

1789 Hiram Bingham, Hawaii missionary, was born in Bennington, Vermont (d. 1869).

1807 Christopher Wordsworth, Anglican clergyman, scholar and hymnist, was born at Lambeth, England (d. 20 March 1885).

1820 John F. Young, American Episcopal clergyman and hymnist, was born in Pittston, Maine (d. 15 November 1885).

1883 Bob Jones Sr., American fundamentalist Methodist evangelist and educator, was born in Alabama (d. 16 January 1968).

1895 The Luther League of America was organized.

1902 Pope Leo XIII (18101903) established the Pontifical Biblical Commission to safeguard the correct interpretation of Scripture, to state positions that had to be held by Catholics on biblical questions, to set up standards for biblical studies and to grant degrees in sacred Scripture.

1904 Jakob Aall Ottesen, one of the founders of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America, died (b. 1 June 1825, Christiania [Oslo], Norway).

1911 Waterloo Lutheran Seminary, Waterloo, Ontario, opened.

1917 Margarete Lenk, writer of religious fiction, died.

1921 Concordia University College of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, opened.

1977 The Lutheran ChurchMissouri Synod received its first missionary sent by a partner church. The Lutheran Church in the Philippines (LCP) commissioned Alvaro A. Cario to serve the Filipino people in Hawaii. Carino was the synods first missionary to the Philippines. Born in the Philippines, he came to America at age eighteen and learned of the Lutheran church through radio broadcasts. He studied at Saint Pauls College (Concordia, Missouri) and graduated from Concordia Seminary (Saint Louis). He served as a missionary of the Northern Illinois District for several years until able to return home shortly after the surrender of the Japanese to General Douglas MacArthur.